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BLOG : The 15-Step Guide To Becoming A Thespian

By Harriet Wilson
Monday 01 February 2016

If you are experiencing the Symptoms of Thespianism (unsure? Check out the symptoms here, and have decided to indulge in your new-found passion, here are 15 things that you can do to establish yourself fully within the world of theatre.

The 15-Step Guide To Becoming A Thespian

1. Abandon all hope of having money to spare in life. Theatre tickets are expensive.
It's not that you can't find good deals – London Theatre Direct does some great ticket offers – but, if you do get good prices, it doesn't mean saving money; it just means buying more tickets.

2. See Wicked, The Phantom of the Opera, and Les Miserables at least once.
Standard productions. And seeing the film versions of the latter two does not count. See them on stage, in their full and proper glory.

3. Become generally angry with the casting of certain films based on musicals.
Not to mention any – 2 – names – 4 – in particular – 6 – but some – 0 – films are just – 1 – badly cast.

4. Learn to understand the above reference.

5. Find yourself some fellow Thespians – these will be useful, when it comes to wanting to take somebody to a show, or just feeling like you need a conversation with somebody who is as excited about theatre as you are.
Step number 6 can help in this search.

6. Throw yourself into amateur dramatics.
You may not necessarily want to go up on stage – or, perhaps not straight away – but that doesn't mean you can't be involved in props (my first theatrical endeavor), make-up, costume ... the list goes on.

7. See one show at least three times.
For me, it has been Wicked. I can't see that show enough times (you can read my review here, if you're interested: Wicked - Do Not Mis Thi Production, Do Not Miss  This Cast

8. Go to the Theatre Cafe (http://www.thetheatrecafe.co.uk/) and let its general staginess soak into you.
I have listed 10 reasons to visit the Theatre Cafe

9. Develop exceeding admiration for a select few West End talents.
Actors and actresses, dancers and singers, writers, composers, choreographers, designers – there is so much talent in the West End; take your pick!

10. When you fall in love with a musical, and feel that theatrical passion stirring, don't fight it: learn all the lyrics; proclaim its brilliance to people who don't really care; quote it as part of a normal conversation – indulge.
If they're good friends, they will just learn to nod and smile at you, and let you enjoy your little ramblings.

11. Practice singing all of the parts to songs that include numerous amounts of people.
The definitive song on which to practice this is the finale of The Phantom of the Opera: "Angel of music, you de – Christine!"

13. Work out where in your house you can belt showtunes without all of your neighbours hearing. This knowledge will prove essential.
My neighbour once mentioned: 'you like singing a lot, don't you'.

14. Know your local theatres.
Local theatre is going to be the foundation of your theatrical life, at least to begin with. Going to the West End is amazing, but you might not be able to do it all the time; local theatre will fill the gap.

15. Be proud of the absolutely useless facts that you know about theatre.
The character of Elphaba, in Wicked, is named after the initials of the author of the Wizard of Oz: L Frank Baum; LFB; El-pha-ba

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If you're feeling generous, you can follow me too (@Harri_L_002) and check out my blogging website: https://harriwords.wordpress.com/

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Harriet Wilson

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